If we are to invoke the moral imagination, we must incite and excite the artist within us

mathematical curves

Recognizing and exploring a variety of ways of knowing and touching reality

What happens if building intuition and art are included in conflict resolution, mediation, and peacebuilding training? […] If the moral imagination lies within us as a dormant seed of potential, and this seed holds the key to breaking cycles of destructive conflict, then our challenge is how to invoke the growth of this kind of imagination as an integral part of developing innovative professionals… Tapping the creative side, touching intuition, knowing things kinestheticlly, visually, metaphorically, and artistically requires avenues of exploration in the educational process that tap whole other parts of human “being” and “knowing.” It suggests that training programs build in spaces for listening to the inner voice, recognizing and exploring a variety of ways of knowing and touching reality. For example, I have for some time incorporated music, poetry, and visuals (paintings, photography, and sculpture) into my teaching and training. In my more experimental modes, I take whole mornings of five-day training events in peacebuilding to teach the rudimentary elements of haiku or invite a musician to write music with the class. There is not an exact formula or an immediacy of results that emerges from these endeavors, but there is a growing sense that if we are to invoke the moral imagination, we must incite and excite the artist within us.


by John Paul Lederach
from The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace
chapter – On Conclusions
image – *keng

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One Response to “If we are to invoke the moral imagination, we must incite and excite the artist within us”

  1. clarissa mcfairy Says:

    My word, this is really turning verbosity into an art form!

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