Share Your Creativity Day

I’m trying something new!

You’re invited to post your own poetry or bits of stories, drop links to favorite literature-related sites, tell us about a recent writing-related experience or some other creative writing goodness. Have a poem in a poetry journal? Drop a link. Have a friend who does gorgeous work? Tell us about it. Have a lovely phrase that you just can’t get out of your mind? Drop it in the comments here. Revving up to do an in-public reading? Tell us about it. Slaving away at Script Frenzy, National Poetry Month or NaPoWriMo? Share the pain – and the glee!

You may also post favorite poetry written by others, if you have permission or if it’s public domain or OK to share according to a Creative Commons license.

If I get a good response, I’ll do it again.

……………………

Please, no unattributed works – if the author is known, let’s give them credit. Controversial topics are OK, but keep it clean. Spammers and viagra-linkers will be unceremoniously deleted.

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13 Responses to “Share Your Creativity Day”

  1. QThomasBower Says:

    this movie

    listen: a hum,
    a rumble, a roar
    a human voice,
    a soft sweet song,
    a sudden breath,
    a car horn

    look: a scattering
    of city lights
    sits below
    darkened skies
    that stretch and loom
    behind faint reflections of a room;
    a table lamp, a candle light
    some figures sit and dance inside
    this movie

    this movie that i see
    this movie that surrounds indwells excites repels and blesses me

    it shames photographic quality
    with colors rich, intense, and live

    devastating and delicate,
    the sound system would make Dolby cry

    it’s also tactile and olfactory
    a complete chemical laboratory
    an interactive 3-D party
    a real-time, sensuous love story.

    but –
    most incredibly –
    almost unbelievably included with this movie
    is an omnipresent
    ⋯ and incessant,
    ⋯ inexhaustible
    ⋯ and constant,
    ⋯ condescending
    ⋯ and contrary,
    ⋯ running line of commentary

    – qthomasbower

  2. E. A. Able Says:

    Thank you for jumping right in, and wow, that’s gorgeous!

    Make sure to check out QThomasBower’s fascinating Flickr sets.

  3. Allen Taylor Says:

    Elizabeth, this is a wonderful idea and your first submission was a fabulous read. I really like the ending!

    The primary thing I’m focusing on right now is the publication of my book of poems based on my Iraq War experience. I was a National Guard officer whose unit was activated for service in 2004 and I spent all of 2005 in Iraq. Being against the war on moral and religious grounds, I struggled with a moral dilemma – serve my country or protest by refusal, which would have likely ended in a jail sentencing as it has for many others. I opted to go.

    Rumsfeld’s Sandbox contains 48 poems written before, during or shortly after my service period. Most of them were written while in Iraq and revised since then. Not all are war related, but there is a theme running throughout.

    Here’s a sample poem titled “Nocturne: Battlefield Sonnet”:

    The night is beautiful, beautiful
    with the raspy breath
    of live fire. Explosive. Death
    tastes sweet like black cherry, a spool

    of brut kisses, or crystal meth
    with soda pop. Even a fool
    can smell the pheromone of ferrous cool
    in a coiled cloud. The smart head of Seth

    sits on a pedestal of bronze
    beaming like a tributary to love.
    Hands of steel firm a grip on time, a glove
    fit to spark a light touch of fear upon

    us. In the end we’re not near as mortal
    as the eyes that peer back through that sad portal.

    I hope you like. There’s plenty more poetic juice where that came from at http://www.rumsfeldssandbox.com and in a variety of forms and tropes from the pure avant garde to traditional verse, free and formal. Again, not all are on the war theme. I even include audio and video readings of the poems and some PDF downloads. Forthcoming are essays on Just War doctrine.

  4. starla Says:

    Doubts

    Doubts rot the soul away
    By crashing you between to different halves
    Boggling your mind up
    And shoving your thoughts into the sand
    While the waves crash around you
    While the night is drawing nigh
    Doubts keep you in peril
    Without conclusion in your life
    And so like a boat
    As it rocks to and fro upon the sea
    You sail along
    Directionless you see
    For you cant seem to stay upon one coarse
    For you are driven between to answers
    And you have doubts
    For which way to go
    Where is your answer?
    Where is the hope for which you seek?
    It is in Christ!
    The one who calms all seas
    Let him lead you
    To the little port ahead
    Not what you expected
    Well if you had known
    You wouldn’t have had doubt now, would you?

  5. E. A. Able Says:

    Thanks, Allen, Christa and Marq!

    I’m up for doing this regularly – anything from weekly to monthly, depending on reader interest. Tell your friends!

  6. Miriam Says:

    What’s in my head has no words, but it is full of meaning nonetheless. Here is a link to a Lakota Flute song played by the revered Native American flautist, R. Carlos Nakai and which I have recently learned to play on my own Native American flute:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuTHmxKLM6c

    If you are looking for a space of peace in your life, listen to this song.

  7. E. A. Able Says:

    Nice! Thank you!

  8. J. R. Eklund Says:

    The Invitation

    We were broken fruit,

    windfalls full of seeds,
    beginning at the end:
    one hundred years of living
    circling between us.

    Our hearts were dry as
    well-kept wheat.

    Today we are Spring frogs,
    round and wet with song:
    come home, come home, come home.

    by J. Ruth Eklund

  9. William Crothers Says:

    The Silver Swan, Who Living Had No Note

    The silver swan, who living had no note,
    When death approach’d, unlock’d her silent throat;
    Leaning her breast against the reedy shore,
    Thus sung her first and last, and sung no more.
    Farewell, all joys; O Death, come close mine eyes;
    More geese than swans now live, more fools than wise.

    Orlando Gibbons

    //Editor’s note – This was originally posted as a comment on another poem. That this happened is part of the inspiration for doing a “Share Your Creativity Day.”//

  10. Mark William Jackson Says:

    Great idea Elizabeth, below is my contribution; this piece has been published in the anthology ‘Miscellaneous Voices: Australian Blog Writing #1’

    Unspoken Love

    It hangs in the air
    between gazing eyes,
    within a mother when she rubs
    for her unborn child.

    You can see it in photos
    of an anniversary,
    in the fingered indentations
    of a well worn rosary.

    It spills from flowers that are
    placed to mark a grave,
    echoes in prayers,
    requests to be saved.

    It flows within the tears
    of those left to grieve,
    waiting for a final kiss
    to get some relief.

    It’s left within the smiles
    when thoughts are brought to mind,
    a sweet embrace that lingers
    after earth bound time.

    It’s when I think of my wife and daughters
    while I’m aching through the day,
    it’s in the ride I take back home
    and when I forget to say

    that love is everywhere
    untouched and unbroken,
    love is captured in these words,
    no longer left unspoken.

  11. Charlene Says:

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    or 35 Years and Fruit Is Hard to Come By

    This is the fruit from trees in orchards whose seeds were planted by the hands of many,
    Tended, nurtured and protected by the passion of many,
    Watered and washed with the sweat and tears of many.
    Oh, we know the harvest is meager, from such a vast field-
    and yet-
    We throw our arms out and raise our voices
    In celebration of
    Each bright
    Shiny
    Apple

  12. E. A. Able Says:

    Thank you, Mark and Christa. Thanks to you all! I want to do something like this on a regular basis, maybe once a week.

    Is Monday a good day? Or would Saturdays work better? Does it matter to you?

  13. Kim Krause Berg Says:

    Hi Liz,

    I love this idea! I have some of my own things I could share if you keep this going. For now, I found this and keep reading it. It really touched me.

    “I honor the place in you in which the entire universe dwells.
    I honor the place in you which is of love, of truth, of light, and of peace.
    I honor the place in you where, if you are in that place in you,
    and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

    (Rumi) on what “Namaste” means

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