We have a duty to voice our opinion and to work to fix the world

fire

My conscience won’t let me scream, “Fire!” in a crowded theater

A trickster attitude would be in favor of artistic expression. But Steven Spielberg, for one, expresses some restraint in exercising his license as an artist. The Oscar-Winning director of the movie Schindler’s List, points out that while he does not advocate government censorship, there is a “fine line between good taste and moral responsibility.” Speaking of a recording company’s decision to distribute a rap song about cop-killing, Spielberg says,

Had I been head of Wagner’s, I wouldn’t have. I would have said my conscience won’t let me scream, “Fire!” in a crowded theater… I’ve always been full of hope… but we can’t just sit back and be inactive and simply hope things are going to turn out all right for our children and their grandchildren… We have a duty to voice our opinion and to work to fix the world.

In discussing issues of evil and morality in the cinema, Jungian writer Martin Schlappner notes that film noire looks at the criminal from within with an attempt to understand him; such films present an ambivalent, non-judgmental view of criminality, and are not interested in morality or immorality…


about Steven Spielberg
from Mercury Rising: Women, Evil, and the Trickster Gods
by Deldon Anne McNeely

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